Dating the quatrain of nostradamus


24-May-2016 14:48

dating the quatrain of nostradamus-9

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of acronyms, anagrams, apocopes, synechdoches, ellipses, hyperbations and metatheses, syncopes, aphereses, epentheses, metonyms, and other exotic grammars and syntaxes.

Nostradamus burned (or possibly buried) the original, , because he did not want to complicate unduly humanitys problem of free choice, or to encourage a fatalism that might deter us from making our best efforts to correct ourselves.

in a manner that would not upset fragile sentiments.

All had to be written under a cloudy form, above all things prophetic...

17th century: The death of Elizabeth I, 1603 (C.); the death of Cardinal Richelieu and Louis XIII, 1642 (C. and C.); the defeat, captivity and execution of Charles I, 1649 (C., C., and C.); Charles II and the battle of Worcester, 1651 (C.10:4 and C.); the Plague of London, 1665 (C.); the Great Fire of London, 1666 (C.); the sinking of the French fleet in the Gulf of Lyon, 1655 (C.); the 30 Years War (C. and C.); and William III of England and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 (C.).

Nor did he wish to interfere with the fulfillment of his prophecies by stating them too clearly in advance.And, he had no desire to incur the wrath of the Holy Inquisition: "I warn you especially against the vanity of the more execrable magic, condemned of yore by the Holy Scriptures and by the Canons of the Church...In the ensuing centuries, about half of his predictions have been fulfilled with acceptable (and sometimes startling) accuracy.Following is a partial list of historical events foreseen by the prophet according to a consensus of some of his commentators interpretations: Catherine Medici and the fate of her sons (C., C., and C.); Queen Mary and the Casket Letters, 1567 (C., C., and C.); the capture of Calais, 1558 (C.); the Battle of Lepanto, October 1571 (C.); the capture of Tunis, 1573 (C.); and the Edict of Poitier, 1577 (C.).

The 16th century French doctor Michel Nostradamus (de Notredame) is widely considered to be the greatest prophet of all time, though Christians balk at the claim (dogma rules that the Bible is foremost).

Nostradamus began to discover his prophetic abilities in 1547: "In 1554, I decided to give way and, by dark and cryptic sentences, tell of the causes of the future mutation of mankind, especially the most urgent ones...